Enlightenment, or Nirvana, is nothing other than the state beyond all obstacles, in the same way that from the peak of a very high mountain one always sees the sun. Nirvana is not a paradise or some special place of happiness, but is in fact the condition beyond all dualistic concepts, including those of happiness and suffering.

When all our obstacles have been overcome, and we find ourselves in a state of total presence, the wisdom of enlightenment manifests spontaneously without limits, just like the infinite rays of the sun. The clouds have dissolved, and the sun is finally free to shine once again.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

Dzogchen Community are people who are interested in the Dzogchen teaching, want to be beyond mind and also relatively being present, only this.

— Namkhai Norbu

All the various types of teachings and spiritual paths are related to the different capacities of understanding that different individuals have. There does not exist, from an absolute point of view, any teaching which is more perfect or effective than another. A teaching’s value lies solely in the inner awakening which an individual can arrive at through it. If a person benefits from a given teaching, for that person that teaching is the supreme path, because it is suited to his or her nature and capacities. There’s no sense in trying to judge it as more or less elevated in relation to other paths to realization.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

To produce a primary [karmic] cause which is potentially capable of having an effect, three things are necessary: intention, the actual action, and then satisfaction.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

The light of the sun is the manifestation of the clarity of the sky; and the sky is the basic condition necessary for the manifestation of the sun’s light. So, too, in the sky two, three, four, or any number of suns could arise; but the sky always remains indivisibly one sky. Similarly, every individual’s state of presence is unique and distinct, but the void nature of the individual is universal, and common to all beings.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

All the philosophical theories that exist have been created by the mistaken dualistic minds of human beings. In the realm of philosophy, that which today is considered true, may tomorrow be proved to be false. No one can guarantee a philosophy’s validity. Because of this, any intellectual way of seeing whatever is always partial and relative. The fact is that there is no truth to seek or to confirm logically; rather what one needs to do is to discover just how much the mind continually limits itself in a condition of dualism.

Dualism is the real root of our suffering and of all our conflicts. All our concepts and beliefs, no matter how profound they may seem, are like nets which trap us in dualism. When we discover our limits we have to try to overcome them, untying ourselves from whatever type of religious, political or social conviction may condition us. We have to abandon such concepts as ‘enlightenment’, ‘the nature of the mind’, and so on, until we are no longer satisfied by a merely intellectual knowledge, and until we no longer neglect to integrate our knowledge with our actual existence.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

Someone who begins to develop an interest in the teachings can tend to distance themselves from the reality of material things, as if the teachings were something completely apart from daily life. Often, at the bottom of all this, there is an attitude of giving up and running away from one’s own problems, with the illusion that one will be able to find something that will miraculously help one to transcend all that. But the teachings are based on the principle of our actual human condition. We have a physical body with all its various limits: each day we have to eat, work, rest, and so on. This is our reality, and we can’t ignore it.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

But karma is not in fact a material accumulation, and does not depend on externals; rather its power to condition us depends on the obstacles that impede our knowledge. If we compare our karma and the ignorance that creates it to a dark room, knowledge of the primordial state would be like a lamp, which, when lit in the room, at once causes the darkness to disappear, enlightening everything. In the same way, if one has the presence of the primordial state, one can overcome all hindrances in an instant.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

But it can happen that a phrase intended to indicate a state beyond concepts just becomes another concept in itself, in the same way that if you ask a person their name and they reply that they have no name, you will then perhaps mistakenly call them ‘No name’.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

But beyond the mind, beyond our thoughts, there is something we call the ‘nature of the mind’, the mind’s true condition, which is beyond all limits. If it is beyond the mind, though, how can we approach an understanding of it?

Let’s take the example of a mirror. When we look into a mirror we see in it the reflected images of any objects that are in front of it; we don’t see the nature of the mirror. But what do we mean by this ‘nature of the mirror’? We mean its capacity to reflect, definable as its clarity, its purity, and its limpidity, which are indispensable conditions for the manifestation of reflections. This ‘nature of the mirror’ is not something visible, and the only way we can conceive of it is through the images reflected in the mirror. In the same way, we only know and have concrete experience of that which is relative to our condition of body, voice, and mind. But this itself is the way to understand their true nature.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

If someone says, they are judging, thinking, speaking: „Oh, this is not only my fault, but also your fault“, you find difficult to accept that, tension develops, instead diminishing. That is not method for discovering. Discovering is, the best way is: you observe yourself.

— Namkhai Norbu

It is very, very important, we are observing, particularly people who are following teaching, still more important teaching following and receiving transmission like vajrayana and dzogchen teaching. Then there is very strong relationship between practitioners and practitioners, this is called relationship of vajra. Some relationship continues till we have total realization, so, we must not creating problems for that. So, in this case you cannot change and modify all situation, but you try to modify or change yourself first of all.

— Namkhai Norbu

If nr. 1 is not mistake, you never mistake, you can go 100 000 millions etc., already nr. 1 you are then taking mistakes, then all mistake. When we have idea like society, community, etc., but nr. 1 is you. So, must be aware, this is Dzogchen attitude, how we should do.

— Namkhai Norbu

It is important what it means a teaching and how we should follow teachings, for having less confusions. People live in dualistic vision. When they follow a teaching, they think: this is my teaching, this is my path. People limit by themselves and path, this way, this is not positive, but it is characteristic of us, human beings. In the human condition, we do always this way, in daily life.

— Namkhai Norbu

In the Dzogchen teaching, particullary, root of all practices, teachings, transmissions, is the teacher. Teacher is supreme important for Dzogchen practitioners. For this reason, since the beginning, if you follow Dzogchen teaching, you should choice a teacher who has seriously that knowledge. If he has it, he introduces you that. Then you can receive also that knowledge.

— Namkhai Norbu

Controlling the position of one’s body and keeping a straight back are not contemplation, but can in fact become an obstacle to contemplation. …when leaving the body ‘uncontrolled’ is spoken of, what is meant is simply allowing the body to remain in an authentic, uncorrected condition, in which it is not necessary to modify or improve anything. This is because, since all our attempts at correcting the body come from the reasoning mind, they are all false and artificial.

— Namkhai Norbu, Dzogchen: The Self-Perfected State

If we go to the essence, the visualization of a single A within a thigle in which the primordial state of Samantabhadra and all our teachers are unified, is called Ati Guruyoga.

— Namkhai Norbu